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Children of fire

973.089 Hol

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Children of fire : a history of African Americans

Holt, Thomas C. (Thomas Cleveland), 1942-

New York, NY : Hill and Wang, 2010.

xvii, 438 p. : ill., maps ; 24 cm.

Synopsis: Ordinary people don't experience history as it is taught by historians. They live across the convenient chronological divides we impose on the past. The same people who lived through the Civil War and the eradication of slavery also dealt with the hardships of Reconstruction, so why do we almost always treat them separately? In this groundbreaking new book, renowned historian Thomas C. Holt challenges this form to tell the story of generations of African Americans through the lived experience of the subjects themselves, with all of the nuances, ironies, contradictions, and complexities one might expect. Building on seminal books like John Hope Franklin's From Slavery to Freedom and many others, Holt captures the entire African American experience from the moment the first twenty African slaves were sold at Jamestown in 1619. Each chapter focuses on a generation of individuals who shaped the course of American history, hoping for a better life for their children but often confronting the ebb and flow of their civil rights and status within society. Many familiar faces grace these pages - Frederick Douglass, W.E.B. DuBois, Martin Luther King, and Barack Obama - but also some overlooked ones. Figures like Anthony Johnson, a slave who bought his freedom in late seventeenth century Virginia and built a sizable plantation, only to have it stolen away from his children by an increasingly racist court system. Or Frank Moore, a WWI veteran and sharecropper who sued his landlord for unfair practices, but found himself charged with murder after fighting off an angry white posse. Taken together, their stories tell how African Americans fashioned a culture and identity amid the turmoil of four centuries of American history.

Available

Non-fiction - JH & HSNon-fiction - JH & HS

1 copy available at Paideia School

ISBN:

978-0-8090-6713-8 (alk. paper)

ISBN:

978-0-8090-6713-8 (alk. paper)

ISBN:

978-0-8090-3417-8 (pbk.)

ISBN:

978-0-8090-3417-8 (pbk.)

LC Call No:

E185 .H57 2010

Dewey Class No:

973/.0496073 22

Author:

Holt, Thomas C. (Thomas Cleveland), 1942-

Title:

Children of fire : a history of African Americans / Thomas C. Holt.

VaryingTitle:

History of African Americans.

Edition:

1st ed.

Publisher:

New York, NY : Hill and Wang, 2010.

Physical:

xvii, 438 p. : ill., maps ; 24 cm.

BibliogrphyNote:

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Summary:

Synopsis: Ordinary people don't experience history as it is taught by historians. They live across the convenient chronological divides we impose on the past. The same people who lived through the Civil War and the eradication of slavery also dealt with the hardships of Reconstruction, so why do we almost always treat them separately? In this groundbreaking new book, renowned historian Thomas C. Holt challenges this form to tell the story of generations of African Americans through the lived experience of the subjects themselves, with all of the nuances, ironies, contradictions, and complexities one might expect. Building on seminal books like John Hope Franklin's From Slavery to Freedom and many others, Holt captures the entire African American experience from the moment the first twenty African slaves were sold at Jamestown in 1619. Each chapter focuses on a generation of individuals who shaped the course of American history, hoping for a better life for their children but often confronting the ebb and flow of their civil rights and status within society. Many familiar faces grace these pages - Frederick Douglass, W.E.B. DuBois, Martin Luther King, and Barack Obama - but also some overlooked ones. Figures like Anthony Johnson, a slave who bought his freedom in late seventeenth century Virginia and built a sizable plantation, only to have it stolen away from his children by an increasingly racist court system. Or Frank Moore, a WWI veteran and sharecropper who sued his landlord for unfair practices, but found himself charged with murder after fighting off an angry white posse. Taken together, their stories tell how African Americans fashioned a culture and identity amid the turmoil of four centuries of American history.

Summary:

Synopsis: Ordinary people don't experience history as it is taught by historians. They live across the convenient chronological divides we impose on the past. The same people who lived through the Civil War and the eradication of slavery also dealt with the hardships of Reconstruction, so why do we almost always treat them separately? In this groundbreaking new book, renowned historian Thomas C. Holt challenges this form to tell the story of generations of African Americans through the lived experience of the subjects themselves, with all of the nuances, ironies, contradictions, and complexities one might expect. Building on seminal books like John Hope Franklin's From Slavery to Freedom and many others, Holt captures the entire African American experience from the moment the first twenty African slaves were sold at Jamestown in 1619. Each chapter focuses on a generation of individuals who shaped the course of American history, hoping for a better life for their children but often confronting the ebb and flow of their civil rights and status within society. Many familiar faces grace these pages - Frederick Douglass, W.E.B. DuBois, Martin Luther King, and Barack Obama - but also some overlooked ones. Figures like Anthony Johnson, a slave who bought his freedom in late seventeenth century Virginia and built a sizable plantation, only to have it stolen away from his children by an increasingly racist court system. Or Frank Moore, a WWI veteran and sharecropper who sued his landlord for unfair practices, but found himself charged with murder after fighting off an angry white posse. Taken together, their stories tell how African Americans fashioned a culture and identity amid the turmoil of four centuries of American history.

Subject:

African Americans--History.

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020 ISBN   $a ISBN  978-0-8090-6713-8 (alk. paper)
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    $b Item number  .H57 2010
082 Dewey Class No 00  $a Classification number  973/.0496073
    $2 Edition number  22
100 ME:PersonalName 1   $a Personal name  Holt, Thomas C.
    $q Fuller form of name  (Thomas Cleveland),
    $d Dates associated with a name  1942-
245 Title 10  $a Title  Children of fire :
    $b Remainder of title  a history of African Americans /
    $c Statement of responsibility  Thomas C. Holt.
246 VaryingTitle 3   $a Title proper/short title  History of African Americans.
250 Edition   $a Edition statement  1st ed.
260 PublicationInfo   $a Place of publication, dist.  New York, NY :
    $b Name of publisher, dist, etc  Hill and Wang,
    $c Date of publication, dist, etc  2010.
300 Physical Desc   $a Extent  xvii, 438 p. :
    $b Other physical details  ill., maps ;
    $c Dimensions  24 cm.
504 BibliogrphyNote   $a Bibliography, etc. note  Includes bibliographical references and index.
505 ContentsNote 00  $t Title  List of illustrations --
    $t Title  Preface --
    $t Title  1: Middle passages, middlemen : Europe, Africa, America, and the slave trade --
    $t Title  2: Many thousands born: the roots of African America --
    $t Title  3: Slaves and citizens: African America in the age of Revolution --
    $t Title  4: New birth of freedom: the destruction of slavery and Reconstruction of Black life --
    $t Title  5: Ragtime: race and nation at the dawn of the twentieth century --
    $t Title  6: Second emancipation: the great migrations of the twentieth century --
    $t Title  7: Second Reconstruction: the freedom movement --
    $t Title  8: Citizens of the nation, citizens of the world: African America in the twenty-first century --
    $t Title  Notes --
    $t Title  Acknowledgments --
    $t Title  Index.
520 Summary   $a Summary, etc. note  Synopsis: Ordinary people don't experience history as it is taught by historians. They live across the convenient chronological divides we impose on the past. The same people who lived through the Civil War and the eradication of slavery also dealt with the hardships of Reconstruction, so why do we almost always treat them separately? In this groundbreaking new book, renowned historian Thomas C. Holt challenges this form to tell the story of generations of African Americans through the lived experience of the subjects themselves, with all of the nuances, ironies, contradictions, and complexities one might expect. Building on seminal books like John Hope Franklin's From Slavery to Freedom and many others, Holt captures the entire African American experience from the moment the first twenty African slaves were sold at Jamestown in 1619. Each chapter focuses on a generation of individuals who shaped the course of American history, hoping for a better life for their children but often confronting the ebb and flow of their civil rights and status within society. Many familiar faces grace these pages - Frederick Douglass, W.E.B. DuBois, Martin Luther King, and Barack Obama - but also some overlooked ones. Figures like Anthony Johnson, a slave who bought his freedom in late seventeenth century Virginia and built a sizable plantation, only to have it stolen away from his children by an increasingly racist court system. Or Frank Moore, a WWI veteran and sharecropper who sued his landlord for unfair practices, but found himself charged with murder after fighting off an angry white posse. Taken together, their stories tell how African Americans fashioned a culture and identity amid the turmoil of four centuries of American history.
520 Summary   $a Summary, etc. note  Synopsis: Ordinary people don't experience history as it is taught by historians. They live across the convenient chronological divides we impose on the past. The same people who lived through the Civil War and the eradication of slavery also dealt with the hardships of Reconstruction, so why do we almost always treat them separately? In this groundbreaking new book, renowned historian Thomas C. Holt challenges this form to tell the story of generations of African Americans through the lived experience of the subjects themselves, with all of the nuances, ironies, contradictions, and complexities one might expect. Building on seminal books like John Hope Franklin's From Slavery to Freedom and many others, Holt captures the entire African American experience from the moment the first twenty African slaves were sold at Jamestown in 1619. Each chapter focuses on a generation of individuals who shaped the course of American history, hoping for a better life for their children but often confronting the ebb and flow of their civil rights and status within society. Many familiar faces grace these pages - Frederick Douglass, W.E.B. DuBois, Martin Luther King, and Barack Obama - but also some overlooked ones. Figures like Anthony Johnson, a slave who bought his freedom in late seventeenth century Virginia and built a sizable plantation, only to have it stolen away from his children by an increasingly racist court system. Or Frank Moore, a WWI veteran and sharecropper who sued his landlord for unfair practices, but found himself charged with murder after fighting off an angry white posse. Taken together, their stories tell how African Americans fashioned a culture and identity amid the turmoil of four centuries of American history.
650 Subj:Topic $a Topical term  African Americans
    $x General subdivision  History.
776 08  $i   Online version:
    $a   Holt, Thomas C. (Thomas Cleveland), 1942.
    $t   Children of fire.
    $b   1st ed.
    $d   New York, NY : Hill and Wang, 2010
    $w   (OCoLC)747306232.
852 Holdings   $a Location  PS
    $h Classification part  973.089 Hol
    $p Barcode  71076
    $9 Cost  $30.00

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