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Committed to memory

PIP 709.04 Fin

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Committed to memory : the art of the slave ship icon

Finley, Cheryl, author.

Princeton, New Jersey : Princeton University Press, [2018]

xi, 306 pages : illustrations (some color) ; 28 cm.

One of the most iconic images of slavery is a schematic wood engraving depicting the human cargo hold of a slave ship. First published by British abolitionists in 1788, it exposed this widespread commercial practice for what it really was - shocking, immoral, barbaric, unimaginable. Printed as handbills and broadsides, the image Cheryl Finley has termed the "slave ship icon" was easily reproduced, and by the end of the eighteenth century it was circulating by the tens of thousands around the Atlantic rim. Committed to Memory provides the first in-depth look at how this artifact of the fight against slavery became an enduring symbol of black resistance, identity, and remembrance. Finley traces how the slave ship icon became a powerful tool in the hands of British and American abolitionists, and how its radical potential was rediscovered in the twentieth century by black artists, activists, writers, filmmakers, and curators. Finley offers provocative new insights into the works of Amiri Baraka, Romare Bearden, Betye Saar, and many others. She demonstrates how the icon was transformed into poetry, literature, visual art, sculpture, performance, and film-and became a medium through which diasporic Africans have reasserted their common identity and memorialized their ancestors. Beautifully illustrated, Committed to Memory features works from around the world, taking readers from the United States and England to West Africa and the Caribbean. It shows how contemporary black artists and their allies have used this iconic eighteenth-century engraving to reflect on the trauma of slavery and come to terms with its legacy.

Available

Non-fiction - JH & HSNon-fiction - JH & HS

1 copy available at Paideia School

ISBN:

978-0-691-13684-4 hardcover ; alkaline paper

ISBN:

978-0-691-13684-4 hardcover ; alkaline paper

LC Call No:

N8243.S576 F56 2018

Dewey Class No:

709.04 23

Author:

Finley, Cheryl, author.

Title:

Committed to memory : the art of the slave ship icon / Cheryl Finley.

Physical:

xi, 306 pages : illustrations (some color) ; 28 cm.

ContentType:

text txt rdacontent

MediaType:

unmediated n rdamedia

CarrierType:

volume nc rdacarrier

BibliogrphyNote:

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Summary:

One of the most iconic images of slavery is a schematic wood engraving depicting the human cargo hold of a slave ship. First published by British abolitionists in 1788, it exposed this widespread commercial practice for what it really was - shocking, immoral, barbaric, unimaginable. Printed as handbills and broadsides, the image Cheryl Finley has termed the "slave ship icon" was easily reproduced, and by the end of the eighteenth century it was circulating by the tens of thousands around the Atlantic rim. Committed to Memory provides the first in-depth look at how this artifact of the fight against slavery became an enduring symbol of black resistance, identity, and remembrance. Finley traces how the slave ship icon became a powerful tool in the hands of British and American abolitionists, and how its radical potential was rediscovered in the twentieth century by black artists, activists, writers, filmmakers, and curators. Finley offers provocative new insights into the works of Amiri Baraka, Romare Bearden, Betye Saar, and many others. She demonstrates how the icon was transformed into poetry, literature, visual art, sculpture, performance, and film-and became a medium through which diasporic Africans have reasserted their common identity and memorialized their ancestors. Beautifully illustrated, Committed to Memory features works from around the world, taking readers from the United States and England to West Africa and the Caribbean. It shows how contemporary black artists and their allies have used this iconic eighteenth-century engraving to reflect on the trauma of slavery and come to terms with its legacy.

Subject:

Brookes (Ship)--In art.

Subject:

Slave trade in art

Subject:

Slavery in art

Subject:

Blacks in art

Subject:

Metaphor in art

Subject:

History in art

Subject:

Art and history

Subject:

Art, Modern--Themes, motives.

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005 LastTransaction     20191114130135.0
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010 LCCN   $a Record content licensor  2017028275
020 ISBN   $a ISBN  978-0-691-13684-4
    $q   hardcover ;
    $q   alkaline paper
020 ISBN   $a ISBN  978-0-691-13684-4
    $q   hardcover ;
    $q   alkaline paper
027 STRN   $a STRN  (Coutts)038394778
035 System Ctrl No   $a System control number  (OCoLC)990248434
035 System Ctrl No   $a System control number  (OCoLC)990248434
040 Cataloging Src   $a Original cataloging agency  DLC
    $b Language of cataloging  eng
    $e Description conventions  rda
    $c Transcribing agency  DLC
    $d Modifying agency  OCLCO
    $d Modifying agency  OCLCF
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042 Authentication   $a Authentication code  pcc
050 LC Call No 00  $a Classification number  N8243.S576
    $b Item number  F56 2018
082 Dewey Class No 00  $a Classification number  709.04
    $2 Edition number  23
100 ME:PersonalName 1   $a Personal name  Finley, Cheryl,
    $e Relator term  author.
245 Title 10  $a Title  Committed to memory :
    $b Remainder of title  the art of the slave ship icon /
    $c Statement of responsibility  Cheryl Finley.
264 ProductnNotice $a Place of prod/dist/manuf.  Princeton, New Jersey :
    $b Name of prod./pub./dist./man.  Princeton University Press,
    $c Date of prod/dist/manuf/copyrt  [2018]
300 Physical Desc   $a Extent  xi, 306 pages :
    $b Other physical details  illustrations (some color) ;
    $c Dimensions  28 cm.
336 ContentType   $a Content type term  text
    $b Content type code  txt
    $2 Source  rdacontent
337 MediaType   $a Media type term  unmediated
    $b Media type code  n
    $2 Source  rdamedia
338 CarrierType   $a Carrier type term  volume
    $b Carrier type code  nc
    $2 Source  rdacarrier
504 BibliogrphyNote   $a Bibliography, etc. note  Includes bibliographical references and index.
505 ContentsNote 0   $a Formatted contents note  I.Sources/Roots (1788 -- 1900) -- 1.Idea: Image and Text -- 2.Form: Essential Elements -- 3.Circulation: Politics and Publicity -- II.Meanings/Routes (1900-present) -- 4.Negroes: Old and New -- 5.1969: Activism, Art, and Performance in the United States -- 6.Art and Activism in Britain: 1960s -- 1990s -- 7.Bodies: Commoditization and Branding -- III.Rites/Reinventions (1990s-present) -- 8.Pattern: Behind the Face of an Iron -- 9.Spirits: From Changó to Iconoclasm -- 10.Roots Tourism and the Slave Ship Icon -- 11.Museums, Monuments, and Memorials.
520 Summary 8   $a Summary, etc. note  One of the most iconic images of slavery is a schematic wood engraving depicting the human cargo hold of a slave ship. First published by British abolitionists in 1788, it exposed this widespread commercial practice for what it really was - shocking, immoral, barbaric, unimaginable. Printed as handbills and broadsides, the image Cheryl Finley has termed the "slave ship icon" was easily reproduced, and by the end of the eighteenth century it was circulating by the tens of thousands around the Atlantic rim. Committed to Memory provides the first in-depth look at how this artifact of the fight against slavery became an enduring symbol of black resistance, identity, and remembrance. Finley traces how the slave ship icon became a powerful tool in the hands of British and American abolitionists, and how its radical potential was rediscovered in the twentieth century by black artists, activists, writers, filmmakers, and curators. Finley offers provocative new insights into the works of Amiri Baraka, Romare Bearden, Betye Saar, and many others. She demonstrates how the icon was transformed into poetry, literature, visual art, sculpture, performance, and film-and became a medium through which diasporic Africans have reasserted their common identity and memorialized their ancestors. Beautifully illustrated, Committed to Memory features works from around the world, taking readers from the United States and England to West Africa and the Caribbean. It shows how contemporary black artists and their allies have used this iconic eighteenth-century engraving to reflect on the trauma of slavery and come to terms with its legacy.
610 Subj:CorpName 20  $a Corporate name  Brookes (Ship)
    $v Form subdivision  In art.
650 Subj:Topic $a Topical term  Slave trade in art
650 Subj:Topic $a Topical term  Slavery in art
650 Subj:Topic $a Topical term  Blacks in art
650 Subj:Topic $a Topical term  Metaphor in art
650 Subj:Topic $a Topical term  History in art
650 Subj:Topic $a Topical term  Art and history
650 Subj:Topic $a Topical term  Art, Modern
    $x General subdivision  Themes, motives.
653 IT:Uncontrol   $a Uncontrolled term  African diaspora
655 IT:Genre $a Genre/form data or focus term  Art.
    $2 Source of term  fast
    $0   (OCoLC)fst01423702.
852 Holdings   $a Location  PS
    $h Classification part  PIP 709.04 Fin
    $p Barcode  18935
    $9 Cost  49.5

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